A Month in London

lucho-23

I’ve mentioned plenty of times in this blog that living in London was always a dream of mine. I liked moving to new locations, my plan was to live in major cities in the states before moving abroad to spend some time in London. I had never been to England, or anywhere else outside the US borders, but that was my plan.

When we initially decided to embark on an indefinite honeymoon, my first choice was Australia, while Jarrell was most interested in Japan. We decided that my top choice was not enough culture shock, while Asia would be too much. Ultimately we decided to rule both of those countries out and instead head to South America (which turned into Central America).

Throughout this time, Londontown remained at the top of my list of places to visit. Although we visited nine other countries before heading to England, I was very excited when we had the opportunity to spend a month in London.

I quickly decided that London is much like Los Angeles, because it is actually a county. So the same way people will say the San Fernando Valley is LA, referring to the county of Los Angeles as opposed to the city, the county of London includes much more than the tourist area. London County is separated into six zones for public transportation, with the most popular tourist destinations, museums and famous landmarks in zone 1.

Another interesting thing I learned during our stay in London, as well as in England in general, is the heavy influence of Jamaican culture in society. After World War II, faced with a labor shortage, The United Kingdom encouraged citizens in its colonies to move with great incentives. This sparked a huge migration of Jamaicans to London, which is still one of the largest Jamaican Diasporas in the world. British slang has a heavy Jamaican influence. I learned their slang from ‘Top Boy’, which I have personally decided is the UK version of one of my favorite American TV shows, ‘The Wire’.

Catch some of our highlights from our stay below.

A Month in London

Of course we visited Buckingham Palace during our stay, we actually found ourselves walking by it frequently, which is always funny. Getting directions, which include major tourist attractions, is hilarious, “Go down to the Buckingham Palace then make a left”.

A Month in London

Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, directly outside the gates of The Buckingham Palace.

A Month in London

St. James Park is across from The Buckingham Palace, here is a view of The London Eye from the park.

A Month in London

The London Eye is much bigger than I imagined.

A Month in London

Mandatory picture with British Royal Guards.

A Month in London

The Tower of London with their World war I Poppy ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’ Memorial to commemorate the 100th year anniversary of the outbreak of the war.

A Month in London

The Tower Bridge at night is magical.

A Month in London

The London Skyline from the Tower Bridge at night.

A Month in London

Public transportation in London is very accessible, though not the simplest. You cannot pay in cash and must use a reloadable Oystercard to ride the local buses.

A Month in London

Walking across the Albert Bridge.

A Month in London

Posing with the famous British telephone booths.

A Month in London

Hyde Park is one of my favorite places during the day.

A Month in London

We would often stop for picnics in the sun after a stroll through Hyde Park.

A Month in London

The beautiful nightly view from Hyde Park, overlooking The Serpentine.

A Month in London

Picadilly Circus is always packed in the evening.

A Month in London

The taxis in London are very famous and ‘posh’ compared to the yellow US versions.

Read This Next

4 comments

  1. Hello,
    I have been traveling the world since I was 18 and for someone reason I decided to settle down get a career and “live happily ever after” however I am suffocating. I want to get back out there what are your regrets and negative experiences? I hate when people just post the great things without sharing the struggles. Do you care to share?

    1. Hey Erika! Thanks for reading. I’ll be posting an article Monday about what it’s really like to travel nonstop for two years. Join the newsletter to be alerted when it’s posted.

  2. Greetings
    I was lead here by the BGLH entry and was intrigued to find out more of your experiences. I live in London with parents from the Caribbean, Antiqua to be exact. It is important to know that people from many of the Islands were invited to Britain after the WW2 devastated the land so it is fair to say that we have all had an influence on British culture. We were invited here with empty promises ending up doing the jobs which the natives were either too lazy to do themselves or felt the jobs were beneath them. We suffered racism, were refused accommodation by Landlords because we were Black. My grandfather remembers having to sleep on park benches in the freezing cold with my grandmother. I too marvel at all the beautiful buildings, parks etc.. in London but lets not forget that the British relied heavily on the success of slavery, something we are still fighting today. If you ever visit London again and it’s just a suggestion, try a Black History Walk, visit the Black Archives in Brixton. There’s also the Sugar museum in Canary Wharf. Sugar was a very Lucrative commodity during slavery in the Caribbean. Sorry for the History lesson, I hope I haven’t put a damper on things. You are both an inspiration to all, keep doing what you’re doing.
    Bless.

    1. Hey Maria! Of course you didn’t put a damper on things! I am very happy to have your perspective and to share this with all the readers. We will definitely be back to London and I will be sure to visit some of the places you mentioned. I appreciate you checking out the blog and thank you so much for sharing!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *